There is no clear relationship between the amount of oil in the marine environment and the likely impact on wildlife. A smaller spill at the wrong time/wrong season and in a sensitive environment may prove much more harmful than a larger spill at another time of the year in another or even the same environment. Even small spills can have very large effects. Thus, one should not merely compare figures — the size of an oil spill is certainly not the only factor of importance in terms of what environmental damage can be caused by the oil.

In 1976, a spill estimated to have been less than 10 tonnes killed more than 60,000 long-tailed ducks wintering in the Baltic Sea and attracted to the seemingly calm water surface created by the oil slick. This could be compared to the effects on seabirds in Alaskan waters from the approximately 40,000 tonnes large Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, when an estimated 30,000 birds were oiled.


We offer very very unique and natural solutions for oil-spill absorbents, : PEATSORB from our Canadian manufacturing associate is something that is accepted the world over and is very safe and have fantastic approvals and gives great results, we want the details attached herewith to speak for themselves, so please read the attachments and see the videos and then give us a call.Please click and download or read these documents for info.


While, wherever we deal, in any industry, where OIL of any type is involved, spilling is certainly considered wastage, some are due to negligence and some unavoidable at many stages and many just happens... but in any case, this is a risky thing, from safety point of view and also from environmental point of view, some pictures and the known oil spills all across the world we all need to have a natural and organic way to do it, that is what we present here.


What_is_Peatsorb.pdf
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Peat_Sorb_Superior_Benefits_Attributes.pdf
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packing_configurations_of_PEATSORB.pdf
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Peat_Sorb_Meets_and_Exceeds_Your_Needs.pdf
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